Wednesday, May 28, 2008

Somatuline Autogel


Hi!

I am having these shots, 120mg every three weeks, since March. I think it is equivalent to Sandostatin LAR? Next week I am having blood tests and my endo will give me the results at the end of June.

I also had the same shots before the first operation, but now the leaflet of Somatuline has been updated, and it says it can be administered by oneself: personally I feel quite scared of THE NEEDLE so, since I have the nurse at 5 minutes from home, by now, I am not thinking about that possibility.

you can find it here: http://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/bhcv2/bhcmed.nsf/pages/iscsatgi/$File/iscsatgi.pdf

Maybe if it is a long journey to have it injected, it would be much easier to do it by oneself. Anyone who tries, please let us all know.

4 comments:

polarchip said...

!!!

My doctor said that Somatuline and Sandostatin are basically the same thing, Somatuline is a little more convenient because you don't have to do this whole mixing procedure.

The last time I saw the nurse, I had her train my boyfriend how to do the injection. He was a little intimidated, mostly because he was worried about hurting me. The nurse said I could give myself the shot (in the butt!) but I think I would need a few months of yoga first.

I think giving it to yourself must be the hardest, because of the anticipation!

Starbucks Addict said...

I thought about doing it myself but it's intimidating. I'm sure I could do the shot myself, I'm just afraid I'd do it wrong and then have to try to get my insurance to pay for the med all over again. That's a problem I don't want! Luckily my primary dr is doing my injections now.

Scott said...

I have taken somatuline depot twice now - every 28 days. the first did not hurt. the second one left a black and blue mark. I thought I could get used to the shots - which I do myself - because I am also a diabetic and have given myself thousands of shots over 30 years. The somatuline syringe is bigger than an insulin syringe and takes some getting used to. I think it is bigger in order to handle the gel format. I suspect that smaller syringes would not work with the drug or else the manufacturer would have used a smaller syringe. I have to say that this is really the only drawback to the medication - otherwise it seems to work great. After a short time with some stomach issues/cramps, there were no apparent side effects and the drug seems to have much improved my acromegaly and my diabetes as well - GH suppresses insulin so normalizing GH has made me more sensitive to insulin and improved my blood glucose levels - I like somatuline and only wish that administering it could be easier - I'd even prefer to take several shots myself in one session if they could make the damn needle smaller. There must be some way.

I am also taking somavert - which does not normalize GH - but which suppresses its reception and normalizes IGF-1. I have had no apparent problem taking both drugs together but it may be too early to tell. For now it's working.

garry said...

You and your doctor will develop a schedule that is right for you. Most people who have diabetes and take insulin need at least 2 insulin shots a day for good blood sugar control. Some people need 3 or 4 shots a day.You and your doctor will develop a schedule that is right for you. Most people who have diabetes and take insulin need at least 2 insulin shots a day for good blood sugar control. Some people need 3 or 4 shots a day.When people going to be acreless about insulin then it should more dangerous for yous life.I like your article and your dedications about insulin you are absolutely right.